The wooden knight used to stand on Svobody Square, under the Protectorate it was again put on show at the New Town Hall. Photo: Brno City Museum

Brno is a city of fine art in public spaces. The theme of this issue, however, casts an eye over statues that have either disappeared from the city or never saw the light of day.

Did you know that Moravské Square featured a colossal monument to Joseph II and that some of its individual parts can now be found in the garden of the Černovice Psychiatric Hospital and Lužánky Park? Would you believe that Svobody Square was once guarded by a huge wooden Germanic knight? And what happened to the bust of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin which used to stand before the building of today’s University of Defence? In this issue you can view photos of removed German and communist statues or feast your eyes on designs that were never brought to life, such as the statue of Jošt or the Brno astronomical clock. Where is Brno, as a city of statues, heading? And which important personalities or events have not yet been artistically commemorated in the streets? Tell us your ideas on our social networks.

Filip Živný

Převzato z časopisu KAM v Brně shop.pocketmedia.cz/predplatne

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